George Herbert Annaheim

1892 – 4th October 1918. Duke of Lancaster’s Own Yeomanry. Royal Munster Fusiliers.

George Herbert Annaheim was born in Bath in 1892. His father James was a language teacher from Switzerland. George was educated at King Edward’s School, Bath, and upon leaving he took up an apprenticeship with the National Provincial Bank of England. Later, as a fully-trained banker, the NPB sent him north to work in Manchester, where he joined Manchester FC. As well as rugby, Annaheim loved to row, especially when he lived in Bath.

Annaheim was in the TA, and he was sent to Egypt in November 1914 as a Private in the Duke of Lancaster’s Own Yeomanry. In early 1915, his regiment formed part of the British defence against the Ottoman raid on the Suez Canal. Later, he became a Lieutenant in the Royal Munster Fusiliers 1st Battalion, and left Egypt. He was killed in France, near Cambrai, on 4th October 1918, during the Hundred Days Offensive that brought the war to an end.

Annaheim was survived by his widow, Dorothy, whom he had married at St. Andrew’s Church, Bath, whilst on leave on the 3rd April 1917. They had a daughter, Wren, who grew up in Bath.

Annaheim is buried in the Anneux British Cemetery in the Departement du Nord, France, in Grave I.B.6.

SOURCES

Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette
RBSremembers.com
Manchester Guardian and Observer Archive
World Rugby Museum

Sign up to get involved:

Latest Tweets

DID YOU KNOW? Broughton Rangers disbanded during the 1941-42 season and reformed after the Second World War. Their last competitive game before this was a 3-26 defeat at Halifax. For the record R. McCormick scored Rangers try #hlfsupported #sportinghistory #rugby

About a year ago from MCR Rugby History's Twitter