Peter Thomas Garvie

13th September 1891 – 25th June 1917. Royal Garrison Artillery (17th Battery)

Peter Thomas Garvie was born in 1891 in Zyrardów, Mazowieckie, Poland, and served as a captain in the Royal Garrison Artillery during the First World War. He first grew up in Warsaw, before his family moved to London. Garvie was interested in a military career before the war began, joining the Officer Training Corps at the Glasgow Royal Technical College (now University of Glasgow) in 1912. During this time he represented his college playing rugby union, and also turned out for the West of Scotland team. Garvie moved to Manchester in 1913, and so only played a single season for Manchester FC before the war began.

In October 1914, Garvie received a commission with the Royal Garrison Artillery, and the following year was sent to Gallipoli. He had a torrid time in the Mediterranean fever. He was wounded soon after arriving in the Dardanelles and, soon after a quick recovery, was struck down again in June, this time with a life-threatening case of typhoid fever.

Once back to full health, Garvie spent part of 1916 on the Western Front. That winter, he returned to Stockport, where on the 2nd December he married Kathleen Garvie. The following summer, Garvie was once again stationed in Flanders, where his battery was involved in the prelude to Paschendaele. The opposing fronts were at this time both engaged in plans to shell the other side into a disadvantage. It is likely Garvie was killed in such an exchange.

Garvie is buried in Dickebusch New Military Cemetery, Cemetery Extension, Grave 11. B.40.

SOURCES
University of Glasgow
Stockport 1914-1918
World Rugby Museum
Manchester Guardian

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